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Aquinas' Five Reasons Christ Rose from the Dead

Posted by Dr. Michael Barber on 04.10.12 |

Jesus Resurrection II

Aquinas pores over the New Testament and comes up with five reasons it was fitting for Christ to rise from the dead (ST IIIa, q. 53, art. 1). Here they are.

1. It reveals God’s justice.

Because Christ humbled himself and died on the cross out of love and obedience to the Father, God lifted him up by a glorious resurrection.

2. It was necessary for the confirmation of our faith in Christ.

Thomas cites…  [Continue Reading]

BREAKING!: New Document Promotes Priority of Scripture in Theology

Posted by Dr. Michael Barber on 03.12.12 |

IBC

Today[March 8th 2012] has been an extremely exciting day!

The International Theological Commission has a new document out, Theology Today: Perspectives, Principles and Criteria. This is an incredibly helpful guide to doing Catholic theology.

To be sure, this is not a magisterial document—an official document from the Church’s teaching office. Nonetheless, this is important reading for Catholics interested…  [Continue Reading]

"Why Jesus was Baptized and Tempted?" with John Bergsma

Posted by Dr. Michael Barber on 01.16.12 |

TSP Podcast Logo

In this episode of The Sacred Page Podcast John Bergsma joins me to discuss why Jesus was baptized and tempted in the wilderness? Here we talk about Creation imagery, Exodus motifs, and Davidic typology in the Gospel accounts—and how they are all tied together!

Get more of John Bergsma’s CDs at www.JohnBergsma.com.
Listen Here!
Audio File

John Bergsma on the Dead Sea Scrolls

Posted by Dr. Michael Barber on 11.10.11 |

TSP Podcast Logo

Dr. Michael Barber explores the Dead Sea Scrolls with Dr. John Bergsma, looking specifically at why Catholics should find them interesting.

You can find Dr. Bergsma’s audio series on the Scrolls here.


Audio File

Exegesis as Theology, Theology as Exegesis

Posted by Dr. Michael Barber on 09.01.11 |

Bible Open Glasses

One of the most jaw-dropping sections in Pope Benedict’s recent letter, Verbum Domini, states the following:

“where exegesis is not theology, Scripture cannot be the soul of theology, and conversely, where theology is not essentially the interpretation of the Church’s Scripture, such a theology no longer has a foundation” (Verbum Domini, no. 35).
In a sense, here Pope Benedict is reiterating what…  [Continue Reading]

The Catholic Understanding of the Saints: Isn't Christ the 'One Mediator'?

Posted by Dr. Michael Barber on 06.03.11 |

All Saints

This is a hugely important question. But, actually, in a certain sense, this question really contains a number of other questions rolled up into one:

  1. Isn’t Christ the “one mediator between God and man” (1 Tim 2:5)? If so, isn’t affirming the ability of the dead to pray for us a violation of that biblical teaching? In light of that, it would seem that there can be no biblical justification for the…  [Continue Reading]

Understanding the Book of Acts—Part 3: More Similarities Between Luke and Acts

Posted by Dr. Michael Barber on 04.29.11 |

saint paul preaching

Be sure to read Part 1 and Part 2.

Continuing our walk through the book of Acts, we can note the following similarities between what happened to Jesus in the Gospel of Luke and what happens in the life of the Church in Acts.

A centurion. . .

A centurion, well-spoken of by the Jews, sends servants to Jesus to ask him to come to his house (Luke 7:1–10).
A centurion, well-spoken of by the Jewish people,…  [Continue Reading]

The Eucharistic Theology of Early Church Fathers

Irenaeus

Joel, who speaks of how he is more Eucharistic-centric than many of his Protestant friends, has a great post up on John Paul II and the Eucharist. Of course, I’m pretty Eucharistic-centric too. : )

In fact, at JP Catholic we participate in the Eucharistic celebration every day.

Anyways. . . since Joel brought up the Eucharist, I thought I’d share a bit from the early church fathers.

Irenaeus on the…  [Continue Reading]


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  • Dr. Michael Barber