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Introducing our Latest Scripture Study! “The Bible and Prayer”

Posted by St. Paul Center on 08.13.14 |

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It’s no exaggeration to say that prayer and its relationship to the Bible are among the most important topics we can examine. That’s because we come to know God through the Bible, and commune with him through prayer. They’re meant to go together.

The Bible and Prayer part of our Journey Through Scripture program explores the human quest for God, unveiling the true nature of prayer: what it is, how it works, and the bountiful blessings available to those who walk the path of intimacy with God. It looks at the prayer lives of the towering figures of salvation history in both the Old and New Testaments showing the different forms our communication with God can take. Decidedly practical, “The Bible and Prayer” also examines the ins and outs of the three types or modes of prayer every Catholic is called to engage in: vocal prayer, meditation, and contemplation. Lectio Divina, Liturgy of the Hours, and many essential characteristics of prayer are also covered. The study culminates in a study of the prayer life of Jesus Christ, the ultimate example of how to commune with our Father.

This summer at the Applied Biblical Studies conference at Franciscan University of Steubenville we debuted our newest Journey Through Scripture study “The Bible and Prayer”. Here are some of the judgements from the evaluations of those who attended.

“This was a great seminar. It pulled so many concepts together – the Church, the liturgy, the goal of prayer – using both Old and New Testament sources!”

“As perfect as humanly possible!”
 
“Well done, good and faithful servants!”

Another JTS veteran said that “The Bible and Prayer” was “the most valuable” series of all and could hardly wait “to bring this back and share with others – the ripple effect – to encourage others to begin praying prayers no just saying prayers!”

Imagine the hearts that will be changed. Imagine the ripple effect — in parishes, in homes, in workplaces, and in neighborhoods when you present this study.